Mar 20

Pest of the Month – March 2017

Light-brown apple moth (Epiphyas postvittana)


* This pest is not currently in Hawai’i. AAA raises awareness of potential pest threats so that arboriculture professionals and residents alike can help our state monitor and identify pest problems when they arise.

 

Department of Primary Industries and Water, Tasmania , Bugwood.org

Description: Described by University of Florida as “extremely polyphagous”, this insect threatens ecological, agricultural, and urban forestry systems. This moth is about 10mm (0.4 inch) long, and difficult to distinguish from other brown moths; suspected discovery of this pest must be confirmed by a professional entomologist.

Distribution: Worldwide across dry, temperate, and tropical climates. In the US, the pest has limited and regulated distribution. It has been intercepted in Honolulu in the past.

 

Todd M. Gilligan and Marc E. Epstein, TortAI: Tortricids of Agricultural Importance, USDA APHIS ITP, Bugwood.org


Hosts
:
More than 120 genera and thousands of species, including: mango, avocado, plantain, stone fruit, apple, grape, camellia, willow, Viburnum, Asteraceae, Jasminum.

Symptoms and Damage: Larvae cause leaf rolling, tunneling and surface damage on fruit, and bud and leaf damage. Most of the research has been regarding potential economic loss to apple, grape, orange and pear crops. Potential impacts to the landscape industry and agriculture in Hawaii is unknown, but could be significant.

Control: The current control objectives are to screen, contain, suppress and eradicate any populations that are found. If you believe you have found this pest, in Hawaii, immediately report to HDOA at 643-PEST or reportapest.org, or bring in 
samples (sealed bag) to HDOA.

 

Todd M. Gilligan and Marc E. Epstein, TortAI: Tortricids of Agricultural Importance, USDA APHIS ITP, Bugwood.org

 Reference:

http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/fruit/moths/light_brown_apple_moth.htm