Jolie Wanger

Author's posts

Rapid Ohia Death Information

Rapid Ohia Death As professionals in the arboriculture field it is our kuleana to do everything that we can to prevent the spread of the Ceratocystis fungus that causes Rapid Ohia Death. Below are some helpful resources. Please watch this short Video Brochure – Very informative visual description. To prevent spread of the Ceratocystis fungus, It is …

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Proper Pruning Techniques brochure updated

Have you seen our Proper Pruning Techniques brochure? It includes a list of AAA Members, current as of August 2015.

Pest Of The Month – Koa Rust (Atelocauda digital)

Pest of the Month – Koa Rust (Atelocauda digital) Hosts: Infects a wide range of Acacia species, including A. koa, mangium, auriculiformis, aulococarpa, crasicarpa, leptocarpa, mearnsii, and polystacha. Distribution: Occurs on all major Hawaiian islands except Lāna‘i. Damage: This rust disease is not fatal to koa trees. Severe symptoms (witches’ brooms) are mainly confined to several or …

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Pest of the Month – June – PSB & Fusarium Dieback beetle/disease complex

Polyphagous Shot Hole Borer – Euwallacea – and Fusarium Dieback (Fusarium sp.) beetle/ disease complex Hosts: Most likely hosts in Hawaii are avocado and coral tree but it has attacked a wide range of trees in Southern California. Distribution: A new beetle species invading California (with potential for spread to Hawaii.) This beetle is being …

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Hawaii’s Jamilee Kempton sets new World Record at 2015 ITCC!

Jamilee Kempton won the Women’s Division at the 2015 International Tree Climbing Championship in March. The Aloha Arborist Association is very proud of Jamilee for winning the International title and setting a new World Record in the Women’s 15m Secured Footlock with a time of 20.16.67 seconds! ISA Results Page Local News Story!

Pest of the Month: Rapid Ohia Death

“Rapid Ohia Death” is a fungal pathogen called Ceratocystis. Altough newly discovered infecting Ohia, it has previously been found on other plants here including Okinawan sweet potato and taro as described in this recent article in the Hawaii Tribune Herald.